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Leadwerks Summer Games Tournament Results

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The results of the Leadwerks Summer Games Tournament are in! I think you will agree, this tournament produced some very fun playable games. Each author will receive a Leadwerks sticker via mail if this is their first entry, and a T-shirt if it is their second!

 

So without further ado, let's look at the games, in no particular order:

 

Slafstraf 2

By Slafstraf

An ominous industrial setting with plenty of interesting puzzles shows the progress the author has made since the original Slafstraf. Play it in the dark late at night for maximum effect!

 

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The Hankinator's Phantasmagoria

By TheHankinator

The Hankinator is back, this time with a creepy sci-fi scenario he says was inspired by watching trailers for "Alien: Isolation". With a shocker of an opening and terrifying stealth gameplay, this one will keep you on the edge of your seat.

 

previewfile_464841782.jpg

 

Castle Defender

By Haydenmango

Defend the castle! Grab the attackers with your mouse and fling them into the far reaches of the realm before they breach the inner wall! The fate of the kingdom rests in your index finger!

 

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Cuber

By SGB

Defend against the waves of incoming enemies by building your cube base before they arrive. A wide variety of enemies and an interesting building mechanic make Cuber worth playing, so give it a try!

 

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The Mower

By hirte

This classic arcade-style game starts out with a deceptively simple premise: Clear the yard of grass with your riding lawn mower. Oh did we mention that if any cows cross the wire connecting you to the generator, you lose a life? Go ahead, see how far you get...

 

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Marble Run

By snowman0674

Based on the marble game template, this title leads you through a series of progressively harder maps. Good luck with the half-pipe!

 

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Beach Roll

By Megalocerous

This marble game puts you in a tropical beach setting with a series of interesting courses to get through. Just wait until you see the new bouncy umbrella game mechanic the author added!

 

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A.F.T.E.R.

By 2ima #bad_connection

At this time, the game is only a simple scene with an empty field, but kudos for making a menu system and getting something out! We look forward to seeing what the author comes up with next.

 

U-Rev

By mdgunn

The third marble game in our list, U-Rev takes a high-tech spin on the genre! Interesting level design and a challenging course make this worth playing.

 

U-Rev.png

 

Summer Maze Game

By fraisgamer

Find your way through the maze to your summer relaxation spot! The scenery and level design will make your trip an enjoyable one, making this the perfect way to finish out our list.

 

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Congratulations to everyone who submitted a game. If you have Leadwerks Game Launcher you can play all these games right now. Got any favorites? Which ones did you most enjoy, and why?



6 Comments


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So far I played The Hankinator's Phantasmagoria, The Mower and Beach Roll. All good games, will check the others out when I get the chance.

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I did beat it, it's just really really hard. I think if you hit the side high enough it works.

 

Some of the later levels use a free-spinning block on a hinge joint, and if you mess up the first time, it is nearly impossible to get it back. It would be nice if those objects' rotations got reset when you die.

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  • Blog Entries

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