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3D Engines Comparison

Canardian

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RankNameOpenGL SupportBasic Dynamic ShadowsFull Dynamic Shadows256+ Dynamic LightsRealtime GIOGG SoundsC/C++ SupportRealtime ScriptingSource Code IncludedEntity Based SystemLow End SupportHigh End SupportPhysicsOpenGL CommandsRealtime EditorCross-PlatformNetworkingPrice under $1000TotalScoreImportance151016141211332471117568091Leadwerks EngineYesYesYesYesNoYesYesYesNoYesNoYesYesYesYesNoYes200142Max3DYesYesYesYesNoYesYesNoYesYesNoYesYesYesNoYesNo0133CryENGINE 3NoYesYesYesYesYesYesYesYesNoNoYesYesNoYesNoYesNo124Unity ProYesYesNoNoNoYesNoYesNoNoYesYesYesYesYesYesYes1499115Xors3DNoYesYesYesNoYesYesYesNoYesYesYesYesNoNoNoNo100116Chrome 4NoYesYesYesNoYesYesYesYesNoNoYesYesNoYesNoYesNo117TorqueYesYesNoNoNoYesYesYesYesNoNoYesNoNoYesYesYes1000118EsenthelYesYesYesYesNoYesYesYesNoNoNoYesYesNoYesNoYes7000119Ogre3DYesYesNoNoNoYesYesNoYesNoYesYesNoNoYesYesNo01010IrrlichtYesYesNoNoNoYesYesNoYesNoYesYesNoNoNoYesYes01011Flow3DYesYesNoNoNoYesNoNoNoYesYesYesYesNoYesNoNo50912C4 StdYesYesNoNoNoNoYesNoYesNoNoYesNoNoYesYesYes3509133D Game Studio A7NoYesNoNoNoYesYesYesNoNoNoYesYesNoYesNoYes199/899914MiniB3DYesNoNoNoNoYesNoNoYesYesYesNoNoYesNoYesYes80915Ninfa3DYesYesNoNoNoYesNoNoYesNoYesYesYesNoNoNoNo0816Truevision3DNoYesYesYesNoNoYesNoNoYesNoYesYesNoNoNoNo150817Nuclear FusionNoNoNoNoNoYesYesNoYesYesYesNoNoNoNoNoYes59718Blitz3D SDKNoNoNoNoNoYesYesNoNoYesYesNoNoNoNoNoYes100619Blitz3DNoNoNoNoNoYesNoNoNoYesYesNoNoNoNoNoYes1005More rows and columns still coming... You can suggest what other engines you want on the list, but please provide the column infos, as I own/know only these engines. I'm more interested in higher rank engines though, as there are tons of lower ranks engines on the market, but I will still add low rank engines too, if I got all info for them.Explanation of the columns and their relevance:OpenGL Support: This feature is important for people who want to make cross-platform 3D development.Basic Dynamic Shadows: Basic or incompletely implemented Dynamic Shadows. Some engines don't have point light shadows, some have only stencil shadows.Full Dynamic Shadows: This means that all lights cast realtime shadows on all 3D objects, including self-shadowing, which means that a 3D object casts also shadows on it's own surfaces, and not only on other surrounding 3D objects. Also PoM shadows (=shadows from 3D textures) are needed to qualify as a Full Dynamic Shadows engine.256+ Dynamic Lights: This is only possibe with deferred rendering capable engines. The alternative to deferred rendering is forward rendering, which allows only around 128 dynamic lights (using a 128 buffers hack) due to color overburn and too low performance if you go above that. However, in most cases only 4 or 8 dynamic lights are used in forward rendering engines.Realtime GI: Realtime Global Illumination means light bounces, color bleeding and specular effects in realtime.OGG Sounds: The Vorbis OGG audio compression format allows high quality sounds at low file sizes and streaming. Also licensing issues are important for 3D application development, where the OGG format provides a GPL free license.C/C++ Support: The C and C++ programming languages have been the de facto standard for industrial computer software engineering since 1972 © and 1978 (C++). The support for external standard libraries is huge, and thus saves companies a lot of time and money when developing computer software. They create also the fastest applications.Realtime Scripting: The engine can be controlled using a script language, and scripts can be changed on the fly.Source Code Included: The engine comes with its source code. Many engines have also a seperate Source Code license, which can be very expensive.Entity Based System: This means that everything in the 3D world is a 3D Entity (sounds, cameras, models, pivots, lights, emitters, etc...), which can be controlled with the same commands like MoveEntity, ScaleEntity, TurnEntity, HideEntity, ShowEntity, etc...Entity Based Systems provide an easy learning curve, and powerful operations with simple commands, since no academic 3D matrix math is needed to be learned by the user.Alternatives to an Entity Based System is a Node Based System or a Tree Based System.Low End Support: This means basically that the engine can run with any existing graphics card.High End Support: This means that the engine supports modern AAA 3D technologies, and requires a SM3/SM4 capable graphics card.Physics: The engine has physics built-in and integrated.OpenGL Commands: The user can freely program in OpenGL language on top of the engine's 3D rendering. This is normally needed only for special purposes, like for example drawing 3D lines in the 3D space. Usually the engine renders 3D graphics much faster due to its internal optimizations.Realtime Editor: The engine has a native or 3rd party with plug-ins 3D Editor which shows the results of editing in realtime.Cross-Platform: The engine runs natively at least under MacOSX or Linux.Price under $1000: A point is given if the engine costs $1000 or less.

 

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  • Blog Entries

    • By Josh in Josh's Dev Blog 2
      Documentation in Leadwerks 5 will start in the header files, where functions descriptions are being added directly like this:
      /// <summary> /// Sets the height of one terrain point. /// </summary> /// <param name="x">Horizontal position of the point to modify.</param> /// <param name="y">Vertical position of the point to modify.</param> /// <param name="height">Height to set, in the range -1.0 to +1.0.</param> virtual void SetHeight(const int x, const int y, const float height); This will make function descriptions appear automatically in Visual Studio, to help you write code faster and more easily:

      Visual Studio can also generate an XML file containing all of the project's function descriptions as part of the build process. The generated XML file will serve as the basis for the online documentation and Visual Studio Code extension for Lua. This is how I see it working:

      I am also moving all things private to private members. I found a cool trick that allows me to create read-only members. In the example below, you can access the "position" member to get an entity's local position, but you cannot modify it without using the SetPosition() method. This is important because modifying values often involves updating lots of things in the engine under the hood and syncing data with other threads. This also means that any method Visual Studio displays as you are typing is okay to use, and there won't be any undocumented / use-at-your-own risk types of commands like we had in Leadwerks 4.
      class Entity { private: Vec3 m_position; public: const Vec3& position; }; Entity::Entity() : position(m_position) {} It is even possible to make constructors private so that the programmer has to use the correct CreateTerrain() or whatever command, instead of trying to construct a new instance of the class, with unpredictable results. Interestingly, the constructor itself has to be added as a friend function for this to work.
      class Terrein { private: Terrain(); public: friend shared_ptr<World> CreateTerrain(shared_ptr<World>, int, int, int) }; The only difference is that inside the CreateTerrain function I have to do this:
      auto terrain = shared_ptr<Terrain>(new Terrain); instead of this, because make_shared() doesn't have access to the Terrain constructor. (If it did, you would be able to create a shared pointer to a new terrain, so we don't want that!)
      auto terrain = make_shared<Terrain>(); I have big expectations for Leadwerks 5, so it makes sense to pay a lot of attention to the coding experience you will have while using this. I hope you like it!
    • By Josh in Josh's Dev Blog 8
      An often-requested feature for terrain building commands in Leadwerks 5 is being implemented. Here is my script to create a terrain. This creates a 256 x 256 terrain with one terrain point every meter, and a maximum height of +/- 50 meters:
      --Create terrain local terrain = CreateTerrain(world,256,256) terrain:SetScale(256,100,256) Here is what it looks like:

      A single material layer is then added to the terrain.
      --Add a material layer local mtl = LoadMaterial("Materials/Dirt/dirt01.mat") local layerID = terrain:AddLayer(mtl) We don't have to do anything else to make the material appear because by default the entire terrain is set to use the first layer, if a material is available there:

      Next we will raise a few terrain points.
      --Modify terrain height for x=-5,5 do for y=-5,5 do h = (1 - (math.sqrt(x*x + y*y)) / 5) * 20 terrain:SetElevation(127 + x, 127 + y, h) end end And then we will update the normals for that whole section, all at once. Notice that we specify a larger grid for the normals update, because the terrain points next to the ones we modified will have their normals affected by the change in height of the neighboring pixel.
      --Update normals of modified and neighboring points terrain:UpdateNormals(127 - 6, 127 - 6, 13, 13) Now we have a small hill.

      Next let's add another layer and apply it to terrain points that are on the side of the hill we just created:
      --Add another layer mtl = LoadMaterial("Materials/Rough-rockface1.json") rockLayerID = terrain:AddLayer(mtl) --Apply layer to sides of hill for x=-5,5 do for y=-5,5 do slope = terrain:GetSlope(127 + x, 127 + y) alpha = math.min(slope / 15, 1.0) terrain:SetMaterial(rockLayerID, 127 + x, 127 + y, alpha) end end We could improve the appearance by giving it a more gradual change in the rock layer alpha, but it's okay for now.

      This gives you an idea of the basic terrain building API in Leadwerks 5, and it will serve as the foundation for more advanced terrain features. This will be included in the next beta.
    • By Josh in Josh's Dev Blog 0
      A new update is available for beta testers.
      Terrain
      The terrain building API is now available and you can begin working with it, This allows you to construct and modify terrains in pure code. Terrain supports up to 256 materials, each with its own albedo, normal, and displacement maps. Collision and raycasting are currently not supported.
      Fast C++ Builds
      Precompiled headers have been integrated into the example project. The Debug build will compile in about 20 seconds the first run, and compile in just 2-3 seconds thereafter. An example class is included which shows how to add files to your game project for optimum compile times. Even if you edit one of your header files, your game will still compile in just a few seconds in debug mode! Integrating precompiled headers into the engine actually brought the size of the static libraries down significantly, so the download is only about 350 MB now.
      Enums Everywhere
      Integer arguments have been replaced with enum values for window styles, entity bounds, and load flags. This is nice because the C++ compiler has some error checking so you don't do something like this:
      LoadTexture("grass.dds", WINDOW_FULLSCREEN); Operators have been added to allow combining enum values as bitwise flags.
      A new LOAD_DUMP_INFO LoadFlags value has been added which will print out information about loaded files (I need this to debug the GLTF loader!).
      Early Spring Cleaning
      Almost all the pre-processor macros have been removed from the Visual Studio project, with just a couple ones left. Overall the headers and project structure have been massively cleaned up.
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