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Jane Croft site + release date + other marketing stuff

Raul

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Hello all again,

 

Today I received an email from our BFG contact. The game is very possible to be released this Sunday 11/07.

 

We almost finished our game site and you can visit it here:

http://www.jane-croft.com

 

After the exclusivity ends we will share the demo to other shareware sites in order to raise our Google rank. The game will also be available to purchase directly from our store. We use for this, the FastSpring.com services. They have a very cheap commission fee :)

 

Also we will contact more game portals but is quite tricky:

 

Too many places selling the game at the same time will water down sales. What we want is to stretch out the lifetime of the game. If we sell it at a lot of portals at the same time, we'll get a large sum of money but then the game won't sell anymore.

 

If we sell the game one portal at a time, then we will get more sales because it's out there longer.

 

That's all for now,

 

Raul.



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Congrats, RVL! I cannot wait. I will also be picking this up since I love these type of puzzle games.

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Guest Red Ocktober

Posted

just in time for the holidays...

 

BIG CONGRATS RV... make a million!!!

 

 

--Mike

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