Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'howto'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Categories

  • Models
    • Animals
    • Barriers
    • Characters
    • Containers
    • Environments
    • Furniture
    • Props
    • Rocks
    • Vegetation
    • Vehicles
    • Weapons
  • Materials
    • Brick
    • Cartoon
    • Decals
    • Dirt
    • Grass
    • Industrial
    • Medieval
    • Metal
    • Plastic
    • Plaster
    • Rock
    • SciFi
    • Sky
    • Signs
    • Tile
    • Stone
    • Walls
    • Wood
  • Plugins
  • Scripts
    • GUI
    • Object
    • Utilities
  • Shaders
    • Post-Processing Effects
    • Surface
  • Sounds
    • Ambience
    • Effects
    • Music
  • Tools
  • BATTLE LEAGUE's Assets
  • BATTLE LEAGUE's Mods

Blogs

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.

Forums

  • Leadwerks
    • Technical Assistance
    • General Discussion
    • Programming
    • Game Art
    • Suggestion Box
    • Bug Reports
  • Platforms
    • Windows
    • Mac
    • Linux
  • Community
    • Showcase
    • Promotion
    • Off-topic
  • BATTLE LEAGUE's Topics
  • Vec-Tec's Releases
  • Vec-Tec's Topics
  • Forth's Development
  • Forth's Game design
  • Forth's Graphics
  • Forth's Documentation
  • Forth's TODO
  • Forth's IMPORTANT
  • Forth's Screenshots
  • The uncertain world's Game Design
  • The uncertain world's Programming
  • The uncertain world's TODO
  • The uncertain world's Graphics
  • The uncertain world's Screenshots
  • Muerte's Discussion

Categories

  • Records
  • Entity
  • Command Reference
  • Vec3
  • Vec4
  • Script Reference
  • Shader
  • Index
  • Material
  • Object
  • Buffer
  • Asset
  • Font
  • Shape
  • Sound
  • Texture
  • App
  • Context
  • Model
  • Light
  • DirectionalLight
  • PointLight
  • SpotLight
  • Attractor
  • Camera
  • Emitter
  • Listener
  • Pivot
  • Bone
  • Sprite
  • FileSystem
  • Key
  • Source
  • Surface
  • Math
  • AABB
  • dVec3
  • Mat3
  • Mat4
  • Plane
  • Transform
  • Vec2
  • Vec3
  • Vec4
  • Mutex
  • Prefab
  • PickInfo
  • Map
  • Stream
  • System
  • Thread
  • Time
  • Window
  • World
  • Driver
  • SoundDriver
  • GraphicsDriver
  • PhysicsDriver
  • OpenGL2GraphicsDriver
  • OpenGLES2GraphicsDriver
  • OpenALSoundDriver
  • NewtonDynamicsPhysicsDriver
  • Draw
  • Color
  • Blend
  • Joint
  • Debug
  • Component
  • Steamworks
  • LensFlare
  • Vehicle
  • Decal
  • Quat
  • Leaderboard
  • Probe
  • Analytics

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Location


Interests

Found 2 results

  1. Now that I have some new models to use, I am having a lot of difficulties with materials on models. Even when using the animation shaders, there are missing patches of the material on the model. If the regular shaders are used, the materials work as expected, but, as predicted, the materials do not "sick" to the model. When importing new models, what are the configurations and settings for the textures and materials? I have been spinning my wheels for hours and end up with the same results. Attached is an image to help.
  2. For my current project I wanted to simulate a light that's shorting out in order to add a bit of a creepy ambience to my scene. After a while of messing with the different things that could be done with an emitter (and failing at getting the effect I wanted), I realized that really, a light that's shorting out is really a light that's turning off and on again. Well, that's something that can be scripted pretty easily thanks to Leadwerk's API. There are a couple of obvious ways to get the desired effect: Create the light in a given position, then remove it again. This can be a pain and can also be resource intensive Toggle the light's color between the "on" and "off" colors, where "off" is transparent and "on" is any color with a visible alpha. Needless to say, I chose the latter. First I needed to define some colors. For my purposes, I wanted to be able to set colors between Red, Green, Blue, and White, so in my Scripts/Objects/Lights/ShortedBlink.lua file I added the following: function Script:Start() self.colors = {} self.colors["red"] = Vec4(1, 0, 0, 0) self.colors["green"] = Vec4(0, 1, 0, 0) self.colors["blue"] = Vec4(0, 0, 1, 0) self.colors["white"] = Vec4(1, 1, 1, 0) if self.color_on == nil then self.color_on = self.colors[string.lower(self.OnColor)] end self:On() end Then it came time to fill in the "on()" and "off()" functions: function Script:On() self.entity:SetColor(self.color_on) self.component:CallOutputs("On") self.isOn = true end function Script:Off() self.entity:SetColor(self.color_off) self.component:CallOutputs("Off") self.isOn = false end I then defined a few top-level variables that I knew I would need, one of which needed to be available to the Leadwerks Editor, namely "OnColor" (the desired activated color). Here's what the top of the file looks like: Script.enabled = true Script.isOn = true Script.OnColor = "red" -- string "Active Color" Script.color_on = nil -- transparent Script.color_off = Vec4(0, 0, 0, 0) Now that I had my top-level variables defined coupled with on and off functions, it was time to add a ToggleLight() function that would do the work: function Script:ToggleLight() if self.isOn then self:Off() else self:On() end end Pretty self-explanatory. If isOn is true then the light is on, so turn it off, else turn it on. This script is missing one thing: UpdateWorld() function Script:UpdateWorld() self:ToggleLight() end I was pretty happy with myself up until I attached this script to a spotlight and almost suffered an epileptic seizure... Thankfully, the answer was pretty clear: I needed to add some sort of a delay. After some experimentation, the desired effect was achieved by performing some modulo division: function Script:UpdateWorld() if Time:Millisecs() % 11 == 0 then self:ToggleLight() end end Basically, we're taking the current time in milliseconds and seeing if it's evenly divisible by 11. If it is, then toggle the light, else leave the light's state alone. I probably could have gone with a better way of randomizing the delay, but this one works just fine and isn't resource intensive at all (if a computer struggles to perform a simple math operation, put it out of its misery). The completed script looks like this: Script.enabled = true Script.isOn = true Script.OnColor = "red" -- string "Active Color" Script.color_on = nil -- transparent Script.color_off = Vec4(0, 0, 0, 0) function Script:Start() self.colors = {} self.colors["red"] = Vec4(1, 0, 0, 0) self.colors["green"] = Vec4(0, 1, 0, 0) self.colors["blue"] = Vec4(0, 0, 1, 0) self.colors["white"] = Vec4(1, 1, 1, 0) if self.color_on == nil then self.color_on = self.colors[string.lower(self.OnColor)] end self:On() end function Script:On() self.entity:SetColor(self.color_on) self.component:CallOutputs("On") self.isOn = true end function Script:Off() self.entity:SetColor(self.color_off) self.component:CallOutputs("Off") self.isOn = false end function Script:ToggleLight() if self.isOn then self:Off() else self:On() end end function Script:UpdateWorld() if Time:Millisecs() % 11 == 0 then self:ToggleLight() end end Just add the script to a light source, type in the color you want (from the choices available within the script) and watch what happens the next time you debug or play your game. Hopefully this saves someone some time in the future.
×
×
  • Create New...