Jump to content

Bumping ..... Adventures in Textures

Marleys Ghost

1,637 views

Firstly, I'd like to take this opportunity to wish you all a belated happy new year. I hope you all have had a great start to it.

 

I have not been doing much on the coding front for the last few weeks. I decided to get some assets created and try and develop my texturing skills a little further.

 

I also purchased Silo 3D Pro over the Christmas period as it was on offer. I had used the demo and was impressed at how "comfortable" it was to use. I now use this package as my main modeller but in conjunction with AC3D and UU3D. Basically Ultimate Unwrap 3D is the junction where all my modelling and art packages meet. Not only for Leadwerks with its .gmf export for both static meshes and animated assets but for all the engines I use, for me its an invaluable tool and a good investment for the minimal cost.

 

I have need of a modular corridor/room set, and decided to set about seeing just how low you can go with the poly count and how much you can offset the inherent "flatness" of a low poly environment with normal mapping and "hand painted" textures. This would be moving on directly from a previous flirtation with texturing which can be found here. Some more incriminating evidence can be seen in the gallery as well, fairly obvious I am no artist.

 

Another aspect of texturing I have been playing with is bump mapping. I use ShaderMap Pro which is great but making bumpmaps from diffuse textures can have horrible "side effects" when creating panelling.

 

Diffuse only:

 

MetalBox_LE.png

 

Diffuse and Normal map created directly from the Diffuse texture by ShaderMap Pro:

 

box_02.png

 

Not really the effect I was after. After a few ideas and some testing I found hand crafting a Normal map "template" from which a Normal map would be generated by ShaderMap Pro gave much better results for this exercise.

 

box_03.png

 

I then made the first test section of the low poly modular level pack:

 

Corridor%2BSection_SIlo.png

 

The textures were then UV mapped onto the section in UU3D and then converted all over to .gmf .dds and created the .mat files using ADN ... I love ADN truly one of the most useful tools written by a community member ever!!

 

Corridor%2BSection_LE01.png

 

I Lined a few of them up just for show .. 480 polys not bad .. considering the default rusty oildrum is 256.

 

Corridor%2BSection_LE03.png

 

Encouraged by the result thus far I moved on, making the section bigger but retaining the tilable nature of the textures

 

 

 

 

Unfortunately real life commitments caused a pause in my endeavours until a day ago so I have spent the last few hours refining some aspects and making a few more test sections:

 

screenshot_7.png

 

Metal_version.png

 

MyScreenShot_2011131_112045.PNG

 

The overall effect of the technique I am developing can be seen better in this video (HD available):

 

 

 

 

This is currently the point I am at, With some preliminary drafts for doors/doorways rooms and elevators/elevator shafts ect. I am trying to reach a point where variation is only a texture change away on standard section low poly models. I am still getting my templates organised and fine tuning the work flow and still very much a WIP, but so far I am quite pleased with the results.

 

Source



0 Comments


Recommended Comments

There are no comments to display.

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Add a comment...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Blog Entries

    • By Josh in Josh's Dev Blog 2
      The Leadwerks 5 beta will soon be updated with particle emitters and an example particle system plugin. Previously, I showed some impressive results with physically interactive particles that collide with and exert forces on the environment. I decided to use the plugin system for controlling particle behavior, as this offers the best performance and can be run on the physics thread. 
      A particle system plugin uses some predefined structures and functions to modify the behavior of particles when they are emitted or as they are updated. This allows for unlimited features to be added to the particle system, because anything you want can be added with a plugin. A system for sending settings to the plugin will be implemented in the future so you can adjust the plugin settings and see the results. The default particle settings and features will probably stay pretty barebones and I will just use the plugin system to add any advanced functionality since it is so flexible.
      void EmitParticle(ParticleModifier* mod, ParticleSystem* particlesystem, Particle* particle) { if (mod->emissionshape == EMISSION_SHAPE_BOX) { particle->position[0] = Random(-mod->area[0], mod->area[0]); particle->position[1] = Random(-mod->area[1], mod->area[1]); particle->position[2] = Random(-mod->area[2], mod->area[2]); } else if (mod->emissionshape == EMISSION_SHAPE_CYLINDER) { particle->position[0] = Random(-mod->area[0], mod->area[0]); particle->position[1] = Random(-mod->area[1], mod->area[1]); particle->position[2] = Random(-mod->area[2], mod->area[2]); auto l = sqrt(particle->position[0] * particle->position[0] + particle->position[1] * particle->position[1] + particle->position[2] * particle->position[2]); if (l > 0.0f) { particle->position[0] /= l; particle->position[1] /= l; particle->position[2] /= l; } } particle->position[0] += particlesystem->matrix[12]; particle->position[1] += particlesystem->matrix[13]; particle->position[2] += particlesystem->matrix[14]; } There are three other new Lua examples included. Coroutines.lua shows how a sequence of actions can be added to an entity before the game starts, and the actions will be executed in order:
      --Create model local model = CreateBox(world) --Add some behaviors to be executed in order model:AddCoroutine(MoveToPoint, Vec3(3,0,0), 2) model:AddCoroutine(MoveToPoint, Vec3(-3,0,0), 2) model:AddCoroutine(MoveToPoint, Vec3(0,0,0), 2) --Main loop while window:Closed() == false do world:Update() world:Render(framebuffer) end This is great for setting up cut scenes or other sequences of events.
      An example showing how to enable tessellation is also included. Tessellation is now a per-camera setting.
      camera:SetTessellation(10) The number you input is the size in pixels of the tessellated primitives. Use zero to disable tessellation. Tessellation is disabled by default on all cameras.
      Finally, an example showing how to use a texture loader plugin is included. All you have to do is load the plugin and after that textures can be loaded in VTF format:
      local vtfloader = LoadPlugin("Plugins/VTF.dll") local tex = LoadTexture("Materials/wall01.vtf")  
    • By Josh in Josh's Dev Blog 4
      I made some changes to the design of the particle system. I am less concerned with the exact behavior of particles as they move around and move interested right now in building a system with good performance and deep physics interactions. Although I want particle behavior to be customizable, I don't think scripts are the right tool for the job. C++ plugins are better suited for this for two reasons.
      C++ is much faster, and particles are a system that will make heavy use of that. Lua scripts can't be run on separate threads. In Leadwerks Engine 4 we have basic particle collisions, but I wanted something more interactive in the new system. I move the particle update code into the physics thread. I implemented collision as well as the ability for particles to exert forces on other objects. Here's what happens when some slow-moving smoke particles interact with a scene: The lower platform rotates freely while the upper platform is motorized.
      When the particle velocity is increase they start to behave like a stream of water:
      Best of all, the speed is surprisingly fast. 4000 particles with collision update in just 2 milliseconds. The code scales well across cores so if you have a lot of CPU cores simulations with 100,000 particles are possible.
      Right now particles are processed in the physics thread, and get sent to the rendering thread for display, but right now the main thread actually never sees the individual particles.
      This is fast enough I think particles will default to full physics. Instead of just being a dumb visual effect we are going to have fully interactive fluids and gases. Flamethrowers can fill a room with fire and it will creep around corners to fill a space.
    • By Josh in Josh's Dev Blog 7
      For finer control over what 2D elements appear on what camera, I have implemented a system of "Sprite Layers". Here's how it works:
      A sprite layer is created in a world. Sprites are created in a layer. Layers are attached to a camera (in the same world). The reason the sprite layer is linked to the world is because the render tweening operates on a per-world basis, and it works with the sprite system just like the entity system. In fact, the rendering thread uses the same RenderNode class for both.
      I have basic GUI functionality working now. A GUI can be created directly on a window and use the OS drawing commands, or it can be created on a sprite layer and rendered with 3D graphics. The first method is how I plan to make the new editor user interface, while the second is quite flexible. The most common usage will be to create a sprite layer, attach it to the main camera, and add a GUI to appear in-game. However, you can just as easily attach a sprite layer to a camera that has a texture render target, and make the GUI appear in-game on a panel in 3D. Because of these different usages, you must manually insert events like mouse movements into the GUI in order for it to process them:
      while true do local event = GetEvent() if event.id == EVENT_NONE then break end if event.id == EVENT_MOUSE_DOWN or event.id == EVENT_MOUSE_MOVE or event.id == EVENT_MOUSE_UP or event.id == EVENT_KEY_DOWN or event.id == EVENT_KEY_UP then gui:ProcessEvent(event) end end You could also input your own events from the mouse position to create interactive surfaces, like in games like DOOM and Soma. Or you can render the GUI to a texture and interact with it by feeding in input from VR controllers.

      Because the new 2D drawing system uses persistent objects instead of drawing commands the code to display elements has changed quite a lot. Here is my current button script. I implemented a system of abstract GUI "rectangles" the script can create and modify. If the GUI is attached to a sprite layer these get translated into sprites, and if it is attached directly to a window they get translated into system drawing commands. Note that the AddTextRect doesn't even allow you to access the widget text directly because the widget text is stored in a wstring, which supports Unicode characters but is not supported by Lua.
      --Default values widget.pushed=false widget.hovered=false widget.textindent=4 widget.checkboxsize=14 widget.checkboxindent=5 widget.radius=3 widget.textcolor = Vec4(1,1,1,1) widget.bordercolor = Vec4(0,0,0,0) widget.hoverbordercolor = Vec4(51/255,151/255,1) widget.backgroundcolor = Vec4(0.2,0.2,0.2,1) function widget:MouseEnter(x,y) self.hovered = true self:Redraw() end function widget:MouseLeave(x,y) self.hovered = false self:Redraw() end function widget:MouseDown(button,x,y) if button == MOUSE_LEFT then self.pushed=true self:Redraw() end end function widget:MouseUp(button,x,y) if button == MOUSE_LEFT then self.pushed = false if self.hovered then EmitEvent(EVENT_WIDGET_ACTION,self) end self:Redraw() end end function widget:OK() EmitEvent(EVENT_WIDGET_ACTION,self) end function widget:KeyDown(keycode) if keycode == KEY_ENTER then EmitEvent(EVENT_WIDGET_ACTION,self) self:Redraw() end end function widget:Start() --Background self:AddRect(self.position, self.size, self.backgroundcolor, false, self.radius) --Border if self.hovered == true then self:AddRect(self.position, self.size, self.hoverbordercolor, true, self.radius) else self:AddRect(self.position, self.size, self.bordercolor, true, self.radius) end --Text if self.pushed == true then self:AddTextRect(self.position + iVec2(1,1), self.size, self.textcolor, TEXT_CENTER + TEXT_MIDDLE) else self:AddTextRect(self.position, self.size, self.textcolor, TEXT_CENTER + TEXT_MIDDLE) end end function widget:Draw() --Update position and size self.primitives[1].position = self.position self.primitives[1].size = self.size self.primitives[2].position = self.position self.primitives[2].size = self.size self.primitives[3].size = self.size --Update the border color based on the current hover state if self.hovered == true then self.primitives[2].color = self.hoverbordercolor else self.primitives[2].color = self.bordercolor end --Offset the text when button is pressed if self.pushed == true then self.primitives[3].position = self.position + iVec2(1,1) else self.primitives[3].position = self.position end end This is arguably harder to use than the Leadwerks 4 system, but it gives you advanced capabilities and better performance that the previous design did not allow.
×
×
  • Create New...