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Object's dimension in Blender and Leadwerks

tipforeveryone

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It should be great if you can create a game world which has exact real-life object's dimensions. If you are using Blender to make game props for Leadwerks, these are some simple steps to help you archive the dimension match up.

Step 1:

  • In Blender, go to Properties panel > Scene tab > Unit group
  • Choose "Meters" from list.
  • Make sure Length = Metric, Angle = Degree, Unit scale = 1

Step 2:

  • This step is optional but can make you feel better with grid floor
  • In 3D View, Press N to open Properties region > Display group
  • Change Lines = 256, Scale = 0.1
  • From now on, you can adjust object's dimensions parameters in Properties region to match real-life dimensions, it will be the dimensions when you import models into Leadwerks.
  • Don't for get to Apply Transformation for object model, it is important. Do this before adjust object's dimensions. In blender Use Ctrl + A > Location / Rotation & Scale

objectdimension3.jpg

Step 3: Fbx export

  • Menu File > Export > Fbx
  • Choose Version = FBX 7.4 binary
  • Scale = 0.01

objectdimension2.jpg

Step 4: Adjust exported model in Leadwerks Game Editor

  • Double click mdl file in Assets Explorer to open it in model editor.
  • Menu Tools > Collapse. This make sure model local rotation is correct.
  • Menu Files > Save.

I attached my template .blend file below this post. It included a 1.7m height human model for better reference.

Leadwerks Blender Scale.zip



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Nice of you to write a tutorial about this. I see you are exporting via FBX, are these settings not affected with the official exporter?

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Thanks, I'll give this a try. With my current setup, the local and global rotation values are different so I wanna see if your settings help with that.

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@AggrorJorn @reepblue

I tested these settings with Leadwerks Blender Exporter and it gave me the same result for object's dimensions. You still need to collapse the model in Leadwerks Model Editor to make sure model local rotation is correct.

 

I updated my post too.

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