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Tutorials and paid scripts

AggrorJorn

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Paid scripts
I am looking in to publishing paid scripts to the workshop. There are 2 script collections that others might find interesting:

  • Advanced Third Person Controller
    • Many tweakable options: from double jumping, to camera offset, camera snapping, smoothing, speed controls etc
  • Spline paths
    • Not just useful for camera paths, but also for instance factory belts, vehicular movement (static cars, trains etc), airial paths (birds, planes), VR on rails.

Tutorials and Patreon
The newer tutorials (part of Project OLED, ) do not have a lot of visitors. Perhaps my focus on tutorial subject is just not right or people don't like the way it is setup. Perhaps the focus on editor tutorials is far more important. Who knows... With the lack of feedback in the past months I am quite hesitant in recording new videos, thats for sure.  

The patreon page was an experiment to see if people would be interested in donating to the tutorials project OLED. There hasn't been much activitity on it, so this is something that I probably will discontinue.  A big thanks to ones who did support me though :).

 

 



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Loved the OLED series of videos. Help me understand some of the concepts a little better.

I don't know why it was receiving little attention.

Looking forward to your scripts in the Workshop. My attempt at 3rd person camera works but the camera moves erratically. 

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On 7/11/2017 at 10:52 PM, Thirsty Panther said:

Loved the OLED series of videos. Help me understand some of the concepts a little better.

I don't know why it was receiving little attention.

Looking forward to your scripts in the Workshop. My attempt at 3rd person camera works but the camera moves erratically. 

Thanks Thirsty, if you have suggestions about a topic, give a shout.

15 hours ago, cassius said:

A couple of c++ tuts would be nice.Keep going Aggror your work IS apriciated.

The userbase for C++ is lower than that of Lua so I am haven't looked in to it for a while now. Did you have something specific in mind?

14 hours ago, Marcousik said:

What about making a tutorial on this ?

Tutorials on how to use the scripts will definitely be made. Not on how to make these scripts from scratch though. 

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Hi. The spline tool is MORE than useful! If Josh would add a new LUA/C++ method so you can put "editor" stuff in there (called in editor mode) and have an enabler in the menu (like VIEW menu -> enable editor scripts), then you would be able to have scripts interacting with the editor and even use the new GUI. That would be something I would like to have!

There is a lot of use for having "scripted sequences" in any game! The only other method of doing that is doing it inside a 3D Application and create an animation using bones. If you move anything, you have to redo the whole animation. Doing it inside the editor is much more easier and less error prone!

I was looking how they were doing "Star war Trilogy arcade" and it surely used spline paths to make move the ships and create the cutscenes, if you look closely, the user is able to "move" a little in offset on that spline path when he's targetting...

So yes, I'm really interested to buy this script. I really enjoyed watching at all your videos! Thanks!

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On 7/16/2017 at 8:15 PM, Christian Clavet said:

Hi. The spline tool is MORE than useful! If Josh would add a new LUA/C++ method so you can put "editor" stuff in there (called in editor mode) and have an enabler in the menu (like VIEW menu -> enable editor scripts), then you would be able to have scripts interacting with the editor and even use the new GUI. That would be something I would like to have!

I was looking how they were doing "Star war Trilogy arcade" and it surely used spline paths to make move the ships and create the cutscenes, if you look closely, the user is able to "move" a little in offset on that spline path when he's targetting...

So yes, I'm really interested to buy this script. I really enjoyed watching at all your videos! Thanks!

The support for plugins/editor scripts has been requested back when leadwerks 3 was first released. Unfortunately it doesn't look like this will be integrated in Leadwerks 4. Based on Josh's blog however, Leadwerks 5 will have something like this in store for us. That would make these scripts even cooler to use. With the spline tool alone you could generate roads, rivers, ropes/wires etc. Object paths are just the beginning. 

And thanks for watching. I am glad you enjoy the videos.

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  • Blog Entries

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