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Some Changes...

Josh

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Leadwerks 3 / 4 was aimed at beginners who were completely new to game development. Since we were the first game engine on Steam, this made a lot of sense at the time, and the decision resulted in a successful outcome. However, in the next engine we are taking a different approach. (This is a direct result of Steam Direct.)

Enterprise is a new market I am pursuing, and we have a lot of interest from aerospace and defense VR developers. The fact that I am American also helps here. There are special features these customers need that aren't necessarily needed by game developers, but I think you will like some of the possibilities this unlocks.

For game developers, I have been moving back to an approach more like Leadwerks 2 where we focus on extreme high-end PC game technology, so that comes down to graphical quality and performance. I think most people here will be pretty happy with that direction. We're going to sell on Steam, Humble Store, Amazon, Microsoft store, Mac App Store, and direct from our website. Less importance will be attached to Steam, as they are just one more storefront we sell through. We're not going to use Steam Workshop.

For pricing of the non-enterprise version, I am thinking $59.99 / $99.99 standard / pro with a monthly subscription option at $4.99 / $9.99. This is actually cheaper than the pricing of Leadwerks, but I think keeping things under $100 is better for the consumer market.

The paid beta subscription is going to end before the end of the year, and it will be replaced with an open beta. The reason I did this was because I wanted a very small group of people testing the early betas (really more of an alpha), and I wanted to test out our subscriptions system. During that time we found and fixed a couple of small issues, so this was a good idea. A big thanks to all who participated and bought me many espressos. ;) 

Finally, we are not going to call Leadwerks 5 "Turbo Game Engine". The name just isn't sticking for me, and I don't think we can get rid of the :"retro" connotations it has. My new technology has developed quite a lot since then, and speed is not the only advantage it brings to the table. I do have a new name in mind, but I am not ready to announce it yet. Until then, I will refer to the new engine as "Leadwerks 5 beta".

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This all seems very logical to me. "Leadwerks 5" would struggle to get the beginner audience as other engines have this well covered. Some provide asset flip products while others offer free assets every month. Very hard for Leadwerks to compete in this market space. Especially as they are free although they take a % of anything you make. 

I can see as the owner of Leadwerks why you would be excited with the interest of aerospace and the military in your product. Guaranteed income is a comfort that allows you time to perfect and focus on the future. Hope you don't forget  your original users.

The loss of the Steam workshop is not a big deal as long as you continue the Leadwerks Market place. I think its a good idea to have a place were users can share assets to help each other out and to provided a modest income for those gifted enough to produce something that other users are interested in.

Pricing is very fair. I don't get why you would pay $10/month when you can own Leadwerks for $100. Inside a year you are better off with the pay upfront option. Or does the subscription always have the latest version  and the pay upfront have to pay for updates?

I was never really sold on the idea of calling the new engine Turbo. A google search for Turbo Engine will get lost in thousands of references to automotive products. Looking forward to the next name. 

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@Thirsty Panther Thank you for the comments. Regarding game content, what I have seen is that DLCs sell extremely well but it is very hard to get people to buy things through a new store. It even seems like people are more loyal to stores online than they are to the actual brick and mortar store they will shop at! So in the future I will probably focus on official DLC-type model packs and just try to improve the quality and amount of content offered of those, since they actually do sell well.

I plan to release paid updates every 12-18 months. I don't plan on ever going back and building a new foundation for our technology, and from here on out I want continuous forward progression, not any rewrites.

I definitely want to keep giving game developers what they want, because you guys give all the useful feedback. Without that, I can't build good software.

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12 minutes ago, 💎Yue💎 said:

The translator doesn't help much, a new name for the engine?

It won't be called Turbo. Something else.

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Looking forward to the new name, I'm sure it'll be as big as everything you do. 

Regarding the new approach, looking forward to seeing you at work, the world spins very fast and this technology changes very fast. In the end everything will always be beneficial for both you and the users.

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On 11/2/2019 at 4:22 AM, Josh said:

I don't plan on ever going back and building a new foundation for our technology, and from here on out I want continuous forward progression, not any rewrites.

Just to tease you, pretty sure you said something very close to this when you were working on 3.  Something like how it'll be the last engine you'll ever need to write.  But I don't think Vulkan even existed back then.  Who knows what new technology will be out there in another 7 years.  I like all the decisions and thoughts posted, btw.

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You can name it Leadwerks V.  "V" can stand as a number but also as a Vulkan. Or just Leadwerks engine? Furher updates can be incremented by year, Leadwerks V2021, etc.

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20 hours ago, rogy said:

Or just Leadwerks engine? Furher updates can be incremented by year, Leadwerks V2021, etc.

This system makes sense on several levels.  For one, if it truly is the last engine Josh will ever write, this will cement that further, while 5 implies that there will be a 6.  Next, the yearly paid updates will also jive well with the yearly labeling.  That said, I'm far more concerned about the new features than the label.

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  • Blog Entries

    • By Josh in Josh's Dev Blog 4
      I have been working on 2D rendering off and on since October. Why am I putting so much effort into something that was fairly simple in Leadwerks 4? I have been designing a system in anticipation of some features I want to see in the GUI, namely VR support and in-game 3D user interfaces. These are both accomplished with 2D drawing performed on a texture. Our system of sprite layers, cameras, and sprites was necessary in order to provide enough control to accomplish this.
      I now have 2D drawing to a texture working, this time as an official supported feature. In Leadwerks 4, some draw-to-texture features were supported, but it was through undocumented commands due to the complex design of shared resources between OpenGL contexts. Vulkan does not have this problem because everything, including contexts (or rather, the VK equivalent) is bound to an abstract VkInstance object.

      Here is the Lua code that makes this program:
      --Get the primary display local displaylist = ListDisplays() local display = displaylist[1]; if display == nil then DebugError("Primary display not found.") end local displayscale = display:GetScale() --Create a window local window = CreateWindow(display, "2D Drawing to Texture", 0, 0, math.min(1280 * displayscale.x, display.size.x), math.min(720 * displayscale.y, display.size.y), WINDOW_TITLEBAR) --Create a rendering framebuffer local framebuffer = CreateFramebuffer(window); --Create a world local world = CreateWorld() --Create second camera local texcam = CreateCamera(world) --Create a camera local camera = CreateCamera(world) camera:Turn(45,-45,0) camera:Move(0,0,-2) camera:SetClearColor(0,0,1,1) --Create a texture buffer local texbuffer = CreateTextureBuffer(512,512,1,true) texcam:SetRenderTarget(texbuffer) --Create scene local box = CreateBox(world) --Create render-to-texture material local material = CreateMaterial() local tex = texbuffer:GetColorBuffer() material:SetTexture(tex, TEXTURE_BASE) box:SetMaterial(material) --Create a light local light = CreateLight(world,LIGHT_DIRECTIONAL) light:SetRotation(55,-55,0) light:SetColor(2,2,2,1) --Create a sprite layer. This can be shared across different cameras for control over which cameras display the 2D elements local layer = CreateSpriteLayer(world) texcam:AddSpriteLayer(layer) texcam:SetPosition(0,1000,0)--put the camera really far away --Load a sprite to display local sprite = LoadSprite(layer, "Materials/Sprites/23.svg", 0, 0.5) sprite:MidHandle(true,true) sprite:SetPosition(texbuffer.size.x * 0.5, texbuffer.size.y * 0.5) --Load font local font = LoadFont("Fonts/arial.ttf", 0) --Text shadow local textshadow = CreateText(layer, font, "Hello!", 36 * displayscale.y, TEXT_LEFT, 1) textshadow:SetColor(0,0,0,1) textshadow:SetPosition(50,30) textshadow:SetRotation(90) --Create text text = textshadow:Instantiate(layer) text:SetColor(1,1,1,1) text:SetPosition(52,32) text:SetRotation(90) --Main loop while window:Closed() == false do sprite:SetRotation(CurrentTime() / 30) world:Update() world:Render(framebuffer) end I have also added a GetTexCoords() command to the PickInfo structure. This will calculate the tangent and bitangent for the picked triangle and then calculate the UV coordinate at the picked position. It is necessary to calculate the non-normalized tangent and bitangent to get the texture coordinate, because the values that are stored in the vertex array are normalized and do not include the length of the vectors.
      local pick = camera:Pick(framebuffer, mousepos.x, mousepos.y, 0, true, 0) if pick ~= nil then local texcoords = pick:GetTexCoords() Print(texcoords) end Maybe I will make this into a Mesh method like GetPolygonTexCoord(), which would work just as well but could potentially be useful for other things. I have not decided yet.
      Now that we have 2D drawing to a texture, and the ability to calculate texture coordinates at a position on a mesh, the next step will be to set up a GUI displayed on a 3D surface, and to send input events to the GUI based on the user interactions in 3D space. The texture could be applied to a computer panel, like many of the interfaces in the newer DOOM games, or it could be used as a panel floating in the air that can be interacted with VR controllers.
    • By Josh in Josh's Dev Blog 0
      Putting all the pieces together, I was able to create a GUI with a sprite layer, attach it to a camera with a texture buffer render target, and render the GUI onto a texture applied to a 3D surface. Then I used the picked UV coords to convert to mouse coordinates and send user events to the GUI. Here is the result:

      This can be used for GUIs rendered onto surfaces in your game, or for a user interface that can be interacted with in VR. This example will be included in the next beta update.
    • By Josh in Josh's Dev Blog 4
      I started to implement quads for tessellation, and at that point the shader system reached the point of being unmanageable. Rendering an object to a shadow map and to a color buffer are two different processes that require two different shaders. Turbo introduces an early Z-pass which can use another shader, and if variance shadow maps are not in use this can be a different shader from the shadow shader. Rendering with tessellation requires another set of shaders, with one different set for each primitive type (isolines, triangles, and quads). And then each one of these needs a masked and opaque option, if alpha discard is enabled.
      All in all, there are currently 48 different shaders a material could use based on what is currently being drawn. This is unmanageable.
      To handle this I am introducing the concept of a "shader family". This is a JSON file that lists all possible permutations of a shader. Instead of setting lots of different shaders in a material, you just set the shader family one:
      shaderFamily: "PBR.json" Or in code:
      material->SetShaderFamily(LoadShaderFamily("PBR.json")); The shader family file is a big JSON structure that contains all the different shader modules for each different rendering configuration: Here are the partial contents of my PBR.json file:
      { "turboShaderFamily" : { "OPAQUE": { "default": { "base": { "vertex": "Shaders/PBR.vert.spv", "fragment": "Shaders/PBR.frag.spv" }, "depthPass": { "vertex": "Shaders/Depthpass.vert.spv" }, "shadow": { "vertex": "Shaders/Shadow.vert.spv" } }, "isolines": { "base": { "vertex": "Shaders/PBR_Tess.vert.spv", "tessellationControl": "Shaders/Isolines.tesc.spv", "tessellationEvaluation": "Shaders/Isolines.tese.spv", "fragment": "Shaders/PBR_Tess.frag.spv" }, "shadow": { "vertex": "Shaders/DepthPass_Tess.vert.spv", "tessellationControl": "Shaders/DepthPass_Isolines.tesc.spv", "tessellationEvaluation": "Shaders/DepthPass_Isolines.tese.spv" }, "depthPass": { "vertex": "Shaders/DepthPass_Tess.vert.spv", "tessellationControl": "DepthPass_Isolines.tesc.spv", "tessellationEvaluation": "DepthPass_Isolines.tese.spv" } }, "triangles": { "base": { "vertex": "Shaders/PBR_Tess.vert.spv", "tessellationControl": "Shaders/Triangles.tesc.spv", "tessellationEvaluation": "Shaders/Triangles.tese.spv", "fragment": "Shaders/PBR_Tess.frag.spv" }, "shadow": { "vertex": "Shaders/DepthPass_Tess.vert.spv", "tessellationControl": "Shaders/DepthPass_Triangles.tesc.spv", "tessellationEvaluation": "Shaders/DepthPass_Triangles.tese.spv" }, "depthPass": { "vertex": "Shaders/DepthPass_Tess.vert.spv", "tessellationControl": "DepthPass_Triangles.tesc.spv", "tessellationEvaluation": "DepthPass_Triangles.tese.spv" } }, "quads": { "base": { "vertex": "Shaders/PBR_Tess.vert.spv", "tessellationControl": "Shaders/Quads.tesc.spv", "tessellationEvaluation": "Shaders/Quads.tese.spv", "fragment": "Shaders/PBR_Tess.frag.spv" }, "shadow": { "vertex": "Shaders/DepthPass_Tess.vert.spv", "tessellationControl": "Shaders/DepthPass_Quads.tesc.spv", "tessellationEvaluation": "Shaders/DepthPass_Quads.tese.spv" }, "depthPass": { "vertex": "Shaders/DepthPass_Tess.vert.spv", "tessellationControl": "DepthPass_Quads.tesc.spv", "tessellationEvaluation": "DepthPass_Quads.tese.spv" } } } } } A shader family file can indicate a root to inherit values from. The Blinn-Phong shader family pulls settings from the PBR file and just switches some of the fragment shader values.
      { "turboShaderFamily" : { "root": "PBR.json", "OPAQUE": { "default": { "base": { "fragment": "Shaders/Blinn-Phong.frag.spv" } }, "isolines": { "base": { "fragment": "Shaders/Blinn-Phong_Tess.frag.spv" } }, "triangles": { "base": { "fragment": "Shaders/Blinn-Phong_Tess.frag.spv" } }, "quads": { "base": { "fragment": "Shaders/Blinn-Phong_Tess.frag.spv" } } } } } If you want to implement a custom shader, this is more work because you have to define all your changes for each possible shader variation. But once that is done, you have a new shader that will work with all of these different settings, which in the end is easier. I considered making a more complex inheritance / cascading schema but I think eliminating ambiguity is the most important goal in this and that should override any concern about the verbosity of these files. After all, I only plan on providing a couple of these files and you aren't going to need any more unless you are doing a lot of custom shaders. And if you are, this is the best solution for you anyways.
      Consequently, the baseShader, depthShader, etc. values in the material file definition are going away. Leadwerks .mat files will always use the Blinn-Phong shader family, and there is no way to change this without creating a material file in the new JSON material format.
      The shader class is no longer derived from the Asset class because it doesn't correspond to a single file. Instead, it is just a dumb container. A ShaderModule class derived from the Asset class has been added, and this does correspond with a single .spv file. But you, the user, won't really need to deal with any of this.
      The result of this is that one material will work with tessellation enabled or disabled, quad, triangle, or line meshes, and animated meshes. I also added an optional parameter in the CreatePlane(), CreateBox(), and CreateQuadSphere() commands that will create these primitives out of quads instead of triangles. The main reason for supporting quad meshes is that the tessellation is cleaner when quads are used. (Note that Vulkan still displays quads in wireframe mode as if they are triangles. I think the renderer probably converts them to normal triangles after the tessellation stage.)


      I also was able to implement PN Quads, which is a quad version of the Bezier curve that PN Triangles add to tessellation.



      Basically all the complexity is being packed into the shader family file so that these decisions only have to be made once instead of thousands of times for each different material.
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